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America’s Greenest Companies

Can you guess who the Greenest Companies in America are?  The E.P.A. recently ranked the 10 largest corporate buyers of green power. 


Check out the List:

 

#1- Intel – Annual green power usage: 2.5 billion kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 88%, Sources: biomass, geothermal, small-hydro, solar, wind.

 

#2- Kohl’s Department Stores – Annual green power usage: 1.418 billion kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 100%, Sources: biomass, small-hydro, solar, wind.

 

#3 – Whole Foods Market - Annual green power usage: 817 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 100%, Sources: solar, wind.

 

#4- Starbucks – Annual green power usage: 573 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 55%, Source: wind.

 

#5- Johnson & Johnson -Annual green power usage: 416.5 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 39%, Source: biomass, solar, wind.

 

#6- Staples – Annual green power usage: 341.5 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 52%, Sources: biogas, solar, wind.

 

#7- HSBC North America – Annual green power usage: 300 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 112%, Source: wind.

 

#8- Cisco Systems – Annual green power usage: 270 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 29%, Sources: biomass, wind.

 

#9- Wal-Mart Stores/ CA & TX Facilities – Annual green power usage: 263.5 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 8%, Sources: biogas, solar, wind.

 

#10- TD Bank, N.A. – Annual green power usage: 240 million kilowatt hours, Percentage of total electricity use: 100%, Source: wind.


To help expand the market for renewable sources of power, the Environmental Protection Agency created a program a decade ago called the Green Power Partnership to coax corporations and government entities into buying green power –which the EPA defines as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and small-scale hydroelectric power. Roughly 4% of electricity generated in the U.S. comes from these sources.  “Even in the midst of what was a down economy last year, we continue to see organizations of all shapes and sizes making significant green power commitments,” says Blaine Collison, director of the EPA’s Green Power Partnership. “Intel went from 1.4 billion to 2.5 billion kilowatt hours. That’s remarkable.”


For many of these companies, buying green power is one of several strategies they are taking to “go green.” Intel’s Sedler says the company’s efforts to improve energy conservation, by switching lighting, adding controllers, and installing more efficient pumps and motors, helped it save a net $35 million thus far. Kohl’s won an award as an Energy Star Partner of the Year for its energy efficient investments; 600 of Kohl’s 1,019 department stores earned the Energy Star label, meaning they use 35% less energy and generate one-third less carbon dioxide than similar buildings.


“Companies are saying there is a larger value proposition here: reducing greenhouse gases and helping to drive a new U.S. green economy,” says the EPA’s Collison.